Frequently-asked questions
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The science behind magnetic
water conditioning

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  Are all magnetic water conditioners the same?
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Hard Water
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  Salinity in Garden and Irrigation water
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  Treating Iron in Water
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  Happy customer statements
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  Happy customers with calcium scale problems......
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  Magnetic water conditioner results with SOIL SODICITY
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  Soil salinity reduction....
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  Salinity and Sodicity (too much sodium)
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How plants take up water
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  Iron problems in bore water
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  What is ozone?
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  How to take a water sample for testing
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How plants take up water

What the plant needs

Seems like a good place to start? It's all about the plants afterall.

Plants need water. We all know that. Why do they need water? For the following reasons:

Firstly, they need water in order to stand up. Some will eventually make woody tissue to help this process, but basically plants are full of pressurised water which makes them turgid. The leaves offer themselves to the sun....their stomata (pores) open....and moisture evaporates. Water is drawn upward from the roots and through the stems to replace this lost water. This process is called "evapotranspiration". The more sun, the greater the pressure to take up water. This process takes energy from the plant, and obviously requires a healthy root system and the presence of AVAILABLE water in the root zone (I'll explain the "availability" shortly). If it's not there, the plant will wilt. In cases of root disease and diseases like Fusarium, you will see whole crops crash down.

Secondly, they need water to carry nutrients into themselves which are dissolved in the soil water. They can't munch on dry fertiliser. No water.....or I should say, "no passage of water into the plant"....and no nutrient uptake. If the plant can't take up water, it will become starved of nutrients. It's not so uncommon to see high nutrient soils and pale, nutrient-starved crops because of an inability of the plant to take up water.

Thirdly, plants need water to photosynthesize. To summarise a fairly complex process, photosynthesis is the synthesis of sugar (energy) from light, carbon dioxide and water, with oxygen as a by-product. Take away any of those factors, and the plant won't grow. It has no energy.

What else do plants need? They need oxygen, and they need it in the root zone. Like all aerobic organisms (including us), they need to respire as part of the process of utilising the sugars they created in photosynthesis, and this requires oxygen. No oxygen, and no respiration. No respiration, and no functionality. The roots can't grow....and can't take up water....and can't supply the plant with the nutrients and water that it needs. This is why we talk about a plant needing DRAINAGE. The problem in a waterlogged situation is not too much water......it's too little oxygen!

Water in the soil

Soil is made up of soil particles in crumb-form (peds), and pore spaces around the soil crumbs. In a well-structured soil, these crumbs are nice and stable....but in a poorly structured soil, the crumbs are unstable which often limits pore-space. The pore-spaces are necessary for holding water, and for the free gaseous exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the plant roots and the soil surface (respiration process).

There are three types of soil water (ie. water in the soil).



Gravitational water: This is the water which is susceptible to the forces of gravity. It exists after significant rainfall, and after substantial irrigation. This is the water which fills all the pore-space, and leaves no room for oxygen and gaseous exchange. In "light" soils, this tends to drain away quickly. In heavy soils, this can take time.

Capillary water: This is the water which is held with the force of SURFACE TENSION by the soil particles, and is resistent to the forces of gravity. This is the water which is present after the gravitational water has drained away, leaving spaces free for gaseous exchange. When the soil is holding it's MAXIMUM capillary water (after the gravitational water has drained), this is called FIELD CAPACITY. At this point, the plant is able to take up water easily, and has the oxygen that it needs in the root zone.

Hygroscopic water: This is the water which is held so tightly (by surface tension) to the soil particles that the plant roots can't take it up. It's there.......but it's unavailable. At this stage there's generally sufficient oxygen, but there just isn't enough available water. The plant wilts, and will eventually die if it doesn't get water. When the plant wilts and is unable to recover, this is called the PERMANENT WILTING POINT.

Now.......a lot happens between field capacity and permanent wilting point. Try to understand this point:

The closer to the soil particle the water is held, the tighter it's held. And the further from the particle, the looser it's held. It takes little energy for the plant roots to take up the water that's far from the particle and is present at the field capacity point. By contrast, as the water is used up (or evaporates), it takes more and more energy for the plant to take up water.

I often use the analogy of drinking through a straw. A short straw, ie. when a cup is 15cm away from you, is easy to use. A one-metre long straw takes a lot of energy to suck up a drink. A twenty-metre straw is impossible to use. It works much the same with plants. The more the soil dries out, the more energy the plant needs to output in order to get a decent drink.

Salinity and Sodicity (too much soil sodium)

Go HERE to read up on this important area, and how it relates to soil water.
WATER SOLUTIONS PRODUCTS
Magnetic Water Conditioners
We bring you solutions to problem bore waters, through our many years of experience in water science and irrigation management. We supply Australian-made MAGNETIC WATER CONDITIONERS.
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Pure Water
Ozone System
The system is capable of treating very bad waters, and the end result is the cleanest water you could ever hope for. No colour. No smell. It's a very easy system to install and to operate, and it's cheap and safe because it's completely natural!

Acidic Water
Treatments
Our acid treatment systems use calcite as media to raise the pH balance to above 7.0. Works with pH balances as low as 5.0. Calcite is an alkaline mineral, which acts as a sacrificial media to reduce acidicty in water.
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Drinking Water
Treatments
We carry a range of drinking water solutions to make your water safe!

Ultraviolet (UV) systems as a total minimal-maintenance system that is installed inline to sterilise water completely. All microorganisms, ie. bacteria, fungi, viruses and algae are destroyed on contact with ultraviolet. Much easier than chlorinating, and without that swimming-pool taste.
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